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  • Your Reaction: What did you think of Isango Ensemble at the Royal Opera House?

Your Reaction: What did you think of Isango Ensemble at the Royal Opera House?

Audience and press reviews of Isango Ensemble's A Man of Good Hope and SS Mendi: Dancing the Death Drill.

By Becky Black (Social Media Editor)

24 April 2019 at 3.28pm | 3 Comments

Press reviews:

The Upcoming ★★★★★
The Guardian ★★★★
The Arts Desk ★★★★
Bachtrack ★★★★
Culture Whisper ★★★★

What did you think of A Man of Good Hope and SS Mendi: Dancing the Death Drill?
Share your reviews via the comments below, or by using #ROHmanofgoodhope or #ROHssmendi.

Both Isango Ensemble productions run until 4 May 2019. Tickets are still available for A Man of Good Hope and SS Mendi: Dancing the Death Drill.

By Becky Black (Social Media Editor)

24 April 2019 at 3.28pm

This article has been categorised Opera and tagged A Man of Good Hope, Isango Ensemble, Production, review, SS Mendi: Dancing the Death Drill, your reaction

This article has 3 comments

  1. Annabel Charles responded on 25 April 2019 at 10:39am Reply

    We saw SS Mendi: Dancing the Death Drill last night. We nearly didn't get there - all trains from Cambridge cancelled - got on the wrong tube etc etc - but we just made it, and boy were we glad. It was compelling. entertaining, moving, thought provoking - just brilliant. It was great to see something like this at ROH, but sad to see some empty seats. More promotion needed - especially among young people. It would have been a fantastic show for school students. More pieces like this, please, ROH! (PS We loved The new Linbury Theatre too.)

  2. Anne Simons responded on 27 April 2019 at 9:29am Reply

    Dancing the Death Drill is marvellous theatre. Such energy and emotion and magnificent singing which gave me goose bumps!. I had already seen the Man of Good Hope at the Young Vic so knew how incredible the Isango ensemble. I was shocked to see so many empty seats and feel that the Opera House should have done more to fil them. There must be many outside the usual ROH audience who would find this work exciting and relevant and attracting them to the Opera House would do much to justify the Opera House claim that it wants to broaden its audience profile. Please let these dedicated performers sing to a full house next week!

  3. Mercy responded on 7 May 2019 at 12:18am Reply

    Being an African I was horrified to sit for 2 hours to watch this play whom depicted Africa nothing but a violent place where people go around killing each other. From Somalia, to Kenya, to Ethiopia and finally South Africa, the scenes portrayed angry Africans, with hatred for each other, witchcraft and explicit killings and beheadings. Being from Africa I was excited to purchase tickets to attend what I thought would bring to light the struggle of a refugee (which I very well know what it’s like to be one), what I saw was a narrative similar to that of mainstream media intentionally scripted to depict Africa as a place of savages. I had my guesses who the director might be and after my research I wasn’t surprised to learn it is a white man catering for a white audience. No wonder the audience in London had an attendance of majority white people whom felt it was a “remarkable” play. The play missed the struggle a refugee goes thru being held captive by human traffickers, having organs removed, sold into slavery in Libya and Egypt, drowning in the Mediterranean Sea, being seen as animals and thrown out in the streets when they finally reach an European country. That is the real journey of a refugee!

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