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Peter Pan

24–25 July 2015
Main Stage

WNO presents Richard Ayres and Lavinia Greenlaw's new family opera adapted from J.M. Barrie's beloved fairytale.

When to see it

    These events are part of the Summer 2015 season.

  • Friday 24 July 2015, 7.30pm • Main Stage

    • Conducted by Erik Nielsen
    Peter Pan
    Morris
    Wendy
    Arnet
    Mr Darling/Captain Hook
    Holland
    Mrs Darling/Tiger Lily
    Summers
    John
    Sharratt
    Michael
    Bottone
    Smee
    Le Brocq
    Nana/Starkey
    Smith
    Chorus
    Welsh National Opera Chorus
    Orchestra
    Welsh National Opera Orchestra
    • First perf.
    Buy

    Peter Pan
  • Saturday 25 July 2015, 7.30pm • Main Stage

    • Conducted by Erik Nielsen
    Peter Pan
    Morris
    Wendy
    Arnet
    Mr Darling/Captain Hook
    Holland
    Mrs Darling/Tiger Lily
    Summers
    John
    Sharratt
    Michael
    Bottone
    Smee
    Le Brocq
    Nana/Starkey
    Smith
    Chorus
    Welsh National Opera Chorus
    Orchestra
    Welsh National Opera Orchestra
    • Last perf.
    Buy

    Peter Pan

The Story

Peter Pan, the boy who never grows up, whisks away Wendy Darling and her brothers to Neverland to join his gang of Lost Boys. With the help of the mischievous fairy Tinker Belle, Peter Pan leads them all on great adventures – particularly against the fiendish Captain Hook.

Read more… (Contains spoilers)

Background

Peter Pan is part of the continuing collaboration between The Royal Opera and Welsh National Opera. Cornish composer Richard Ayres's opera was first performed in December 2013 by Stuttgart Opera and is now given its UK premiere in a new production by acclaimed director Keith Warner (The Royal Opera's Ring cycle and Wozzeck). Following on from the success of Ayres's previous family opera The Cricket Recovers (Aldeburgh Music, 2005), the composer has provided an energetic score full of colour and invention.

Ayres and his librettist, the award-winning poet Lavinia Greenlaw, shared memories of their own childhoods when they began work on Peter Pan, and these became the starting point for their own adaptation. The result is far from saccharine, returning to the danger, vibrancy and sheer anarchy of the J.M. Barrie original. Ayres has described how one of his greatest challenges as a composer has been ' to find a musical language that not only suits a world full of children, but also one that describes a bizarre, slightly disturbing and dreamlike world'.