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The Story

When sensitive Tatiana declares her love for the dashing Eugene Onegin, he coldly rejects her. He idly flirts with her sister, Olga, enraging her fiancé and Onegin's only friend, Lensky, who challenges Onegin to a duel.

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  1. Your Reaction: Onegin

    21 January 2013

    A selection of audience tweets about The Royal Ballet's staging of Cranko's take on Pushkin's classic.

Background

John Cranko became acquainted with Alexander Pushkin’s verse-novel Eugene Onegin when he choreographed the dances for Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky’s opera of the same name in 1952. He created his own distinctive version of Pushkin’s work in 1965 for the Stuttgart Ballet. Onegin displays all of Cranko’s genius as a narrative choreographer, featuring finely drawn characters who are transformed by the conflicts they face.

Onegin and Tatiana’s relationship is depicted in intense duets, such as the letter-writing scene, when the youthful Tatiana dances a dream pas de deux with her longed-for lover. The role of Tatiana offers a ballerina many challenges – the development of a bookish country girl into a sophisticated woman at the pinnacle of St Petersburg society requires dramatic sensibility and technical finesse. Cranko’s choreography incorporates an eclectic range of dance forms, including folk, modern, ballroom and acrobatic, and is accompanied by Kurt-Heinz Stolze’s soaring arrangement of Tchaikovsky’s music, drawing principally on his works for piano.