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  • Watch: Members of the cast and creative team on La traviata

Watch: Members of the cast and creative team on La traviata

Another chance to watch films shown in the intervals of the live cinema relay of La traviata, including stage rehearsal footage and exclusive interviews.

By Rose Slavin (Assistant Content Producer)

4 February 2016 at 8.24pm | 7 Comments

Richard Eyre’s production of Verdi’s La traviata was relayed live to cinemas around the world on 4 February 2016.

During the interval audiences saw several short films featuring interviews with the cast and creative team as well as footage of the opera in rehearsal.

If you missed the screening here’s a chance to watch the films:

An Introduction to La traviata:

La traviata portrays the passionate relationship between Alfredo and the courtesan Violetta.

‘This opera begins at 90 miles an hour,’ says Revival Director Dan Dooner.

Russian soprano Venera Gimadieva and Albania tenor Saimir Pirgu who sang the role of the tragic lovers, Violetta and Alfredo, described why Verdi's score is so unforgettable.

'The music is simple', says Venera. 'But in this simplicity you can find very deep things.'

'Verdi focused on the love', agrees Pirgu. 'That's why the opera is so beautiful.'

Inside the the movement of La traviata:

‘Richard [Eyre] wanted to create a world of incredible parties’ says Movement director Jane Gibson.

In this film Jane explains how important movement and dance is in developing the texture and storytelling in Eyre’s production of La traviata.

In the 19th century, parties were truly theatrical occasions and performers were often plucked from stage and invited to entertain guests at lavish events. In this production, dancing is used to accentuate tensions between different elements of society – particularly when gypsy women perform at one soirée.

‘I hope it will be very alive physicality, not just wonderful singing' – Gibson enthuses, 'but something in the body that emanates into the whole house.'

Behind the music of La Traviata

Conductor Yves Abel takes us through the music of La traviata, introducing the opera’s unforgettable theme and pinpointing his favourite musical moments.

Speaking as he plays the piano, Abel explains how Verdi’s music identifies the emotions and personality of each character.

‘What’s great about Verdi’s music is his ability to humanize people', he says. 'His ability to show that they have two sides – they’re not either demons or angels, they're flawed human beings'.

An extra film is available to watch in the La traviata Digital Programme. Download yours for free using the promo code 'FREETRAV' and view a selection of images and articles that explore the production and the history behind it.

Watch more films like this on the Royal Opera House YouTube channel:

La traviata runs 16 January – 1 February 2017. Tickets are still available.

By Rose Slavin (Assistant Content Producer)

4 February 2016 at 8.24pm

This article has been categorised Opera and tagged backstage films, by Richard Eyre, cinema, La traviata, live relay, Production

This article has 7 comments

  1. I have seen 5 times and it's take my breath away. Romantic, broken heart and tragic. Wonderful! !

  2. Izak Bol responded on 4 February 2016 at 11:56pm Reply

    On the 4th of febr my wife and I visited the movie of La Traviata in the 'Filmhuis' in the Hague in Holland. From the beginning of the movie, the 1st act, there were about 10 interruptions and in the 2nd act, there were so many interruptions that we left the movieroom. The personel of the Filmhuis told that the streaming was not ok and they couldnt help it. That was our experience today.
    Izak Bol
    Voorschoten
    Holland

    • Sarah Walsh (Cinema Account Coordinator) responded on 5 February 2016 at 10:19am

      Dear Izak,

      I'm very sorry that you and your wife had this experience during La Traviata. The stream coming from us was flawless last night so I will contact Filmhuis and find out what went wrong. To clarify, when you say "interruptions" do you mean sound or picture or both?

      Kind regards,

      Sarah

  3. Andrew responded on 5 February 2016 at 7:36pm Reply

    My wife and I went to La Traviata at Cineworld in Glasgow on Thursday 4th February. We enjoyed the performance but we were a bit disappointed by the sound quality. The singers in La Traviata sounded as if they were performing behind a curtain which gave the sound a muffled dull feeling. We're familiar with New York MET productions in the same cinema and their sound quality is much better. I know the MET has a bigger budget than the RoH and that really does show in the quality of their cinema events.

  4. Brian Walsh responded on 8 February 2016 at 3:30pm Reply

    Good Afternoon Sarah I see that some viewers in different parts had sound and interuptions problems. I watch La Traviata at the Cine World in Middlesbrough and the sound could not have been better if I had been inside the ROH. It was fabulous. I think the various problems people had was more to do with localized conditions rather than the ROH streaming. At Cine World I have NEVER experienced these problems. Keep the good work up Sarah,

  5. My experience of streaming at cinemas is that they tend to have the volume too high to the point of distortion, this also applies to the orchestra. They are geared up to the volumes required for Star Wars etc. I am sure some cinemas get it right, but not the ones I have been to. I am also sure the sound quality transmitted by the ROH is first class.

    • Sarah Walsh (Cinema Account Coordinator) responded on 10 March 2016 at 9:37am

      Dear Bob,

      Thank you for your comments. Each live event is transmitted from the ROH at the same volume levels and it's then up to the cinemas to adjust as they feel necessary. Please do speak to the cinema on the night if you're unhappy with the volume settings as they are easily adjustable. We are also happy to receive feedback on your experiences and can take up any issues with the cinemas from our end too.

      Kind regards,

      Sarah

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