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Listen: How can children and young people best learn about culture?

Speakers at ROH Bridge conference discuss the importance of creativity in schools and education.

By Thea King (Communications Coordinator, Royal Opera House Bridge)

2 July 2013 at 3.17pm | 2 Comments

Following on from ‘Re-Imagining Cultural Learning’ – a day held by Royal Opera House Bridge to explore the future of cultural learning – you can now hear the introduction to the day as well as full presentations from four key speakers.

Nic Marks Founder of the Centre for Well-Being 

Nic Marks took to the stand first to explore the role of happiness and creativity in learning.

We pay more attention when we are in a good mood and are more creative…we are more open to relationships… You could say that the evolutionary role of positive emotions is about opportunities. The evolutionary role of so called negative emotions is about threats.

Martin Green
 Former head of Ceremonies at London 2012 Olympics

Martin Green gives a first hand account of what it takes to build the ‘biggest show on earth’ and why art and creativity are so important.

The main message is if you’re going to succeed you need to trust in artists and you need to protect the integrity of the idea. We all work in culture and unless we can trust people to believe in the integrity of a single idea and fight it through, you’ll end up with beige soup.

Louise Thomas
 Education lead at the Innovation unit 

Louise Thomas follows-up with a fascinating look at the future of schools and the innovative practice currently taking place.

What’s really important about these ‘re-imagined’ schools is not so much what they’re doing so much as how they are challenging conventional notions of how time, space, relationships and learning are constructed in their schools.

Mick Waters

Education Consultant 
Professor Mick Waters finished up the day with a brilliant round of thoughts raised during the presentations and discussions from the day. Mick tackles provocative questions including ‘Does having culture in schools matter?’

What might schools do to take on Culture?  Do we say if you take on culture in our schools it will help your results; your attendance will get better; your behaviour will get better; your exclusions will drop?  Do we pander to the notion that if you do this OFSTED will like it? …which in truth they will. OFSTED does recognize the width of the curriculum and the offer to youngsters…but is that what we go for or do we say that culture has a value as culture?  It should be there as an essential for every youngster and it should be a way of understanding the world in which we live… Young people need a guarantee of lifetime experiences!

Re-imagining Cultural Learning offered valuable time to discuss and reflect on the future of cultural learning. Guests included teachers and senior leaders from across arts, education and cultural settings and local authorities in each of the Royal Opera House Bridge areas – Essex, Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire and North Kent.

Royal Opera House Bridge is a three-year, publicly funded Arts Council England project that helps to connect children and young people with great art and culture.

By Thea King (Communications Coordinator, Royal Opera House Bridge)

2 July 2013 at 3.17pm

This article has been categorised Learning, Off stage and tagged conference, experience, Louise Thomas, Martin Green, Mick Waters, Nic Marks, ROH Bridge, Royal Opera House Bridge, schools

This article has 2 comments

  1. Midsman responded on 2 July 2013 at 7:13pm Reply

    I have been "Cultured" for 50 years because my parents took me to theatre from a young age.
    Neither of my schools had any input at all.

  2. Stephen Cutler responded on 3 July 2013 at 5:40pm Reply

    "this is so important how we can adapt to our environment in a positive way. You could say probably…that the evolutionary role of positive emotions is about opportunities. The evolutionary role of so called negative emotions is about threats."

    "We all work in culture and unless we can trust people to believe in the integrity of a single idea and fight it through otherwise you end up with beige soup all the time."

    Do these people speak English?

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