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Der Ring des Nibelungen

Four full cycles performed September–November 2018

The 2018/19 Season opens with the second revival of The Royal Opera’s magnificent 2004–6 staging of Richard Wagner’s Der Ring des Nibelungen, in Keith Warner’s stunning production. Conducted by The Royal Opera’s Music Director, Antonio Pappano, it features a world-class, international cast including Nina Stemme, John Lundgren, Johannes Martin Kränzle, Sarah Connolly, Emily Magee, Stuart Skelton, Stefan Vinke, Ain Anger, Gerhard Siegel, Alan Oke and Stephen Milling.

Advance booking for the Friends of Covent Garden opens from 23 October 2017. General booking opens 8 November 2017.

Choose Cycle

The operas

Das Rheingold

The first opera introduces the characters and themes of this epic cycle.

Die Walküre

The second opera thrillingly depicts the discovery of a great love.

Siegfried

The third opera revels in its depiction of heroism even as it sets up the cycle’s dramatic conclusion.

Götterdämmerung

The Twilight of the Gods, the fourth and final opera, brings this magnificent tale of gods and mortals to a fiery close.

Cycle dates

Cycle One

Das Rheingold: Monday 24 September 2018, 7.30pm
Die Walküre: Wednesday 26 September 2018, 4.30pm
Siegfried: Saturday 29 September 2018, 3pm
Götterdämmerung: Monday 1 October 2018, 4pm

Cycle Two

Das Rheingold: Tuesday 2 October 2018, 7.30pm
Die Walküre: Thursday 4 October 2018, 4.30pm
Siegfried: Sunday 7 October 2018, 3pm
Götterdämmerung: Tuesday 9 October 2018, 4pm

Cycle Three

Das Rheingold: Tuesday 16 October 2018, 7.30pm
Die Walküre: Thursday 18 October 2018, 4.30pm
Siegfried: Sunday 21 October 2018, 3pm
Götterdämmerung: Wednesday 24 October 2018, 4pm

Cycle Four

Das Rheingold: Friday 26 October 2018, 7.30pm
Die Walküre: Sunday 28 October 2018, 4pm
Siegfried: Wednesday 31 October 2018, 4.30pm
Götterdämmerung: Friday 2 November 2018, 4pm

Prices

See the seating map and prices (PDF)

Insights – Discover the Ring

As part of our celebration of Wagner's Ring Cycle, the Insights Programme will be hosting a full afternoon of events specially designed to make your forays into Wagner and the Ring Cycle more exciting and memorable. Events will include debates, interviews, talks and a few surprises suitable for everyone from the complete Wagner novice through to the most seasoned Ring expert. Visit the Ring Insights page to find out more.

Open Up and the Ring Cycle

The performances of the Ring Cycle take place after the Royal Opera House's Open Up project. While the interior of the main auditorium is not being changed, we are changing the signage around the Royal Opera House. Consequently, Ring Cycle tickets (physical and e-ticket) will look slightly different from all other main-stage tickets for performances that take place before the Ring Cycle.

Menu options and prices

Read more about our menu options and prices. To make a reservation go to your account.

Thanks to

Originally made possible by

The Dalriada Trust

Position of Music Director Maestro Antonio Pappano generously supported by

Mrs Susan A. Olde OBE

Generous philanthropic support from

Mrs Philip Kan, Mercedes T. Bass, Maggie Copus, Peter and Fiona Espenhahn, Mary Ellen Johnson and Richard Karl Goeltz, Malcolm Herring, The Metherell family, The Mikheev Charitable Trust, Lindsay and Sarah Tomlinson, the Ring Production Syndicate, the Wagner Circle, The Royal Opera House Endowment Fund, the American Friends of Covent Garden and an anonymous donor.

How to support the Royal Opera House

Find out about supporting productions at the Royal Opera House

News and features

  1. 3 October 2018

    Your Reaction: What did you think of Wagner's Ring Cycle?

    Music's greatest marathon kicked off The Royal Opera's 2018/19 Season.

  2. 20 June 2017

    10 of opera’s greatest tenor roles

    Our favourites of the undisputed kings of opera, from Idomeneo to Peter Grimes via Siegfried and Otello.

  3. 15 September 2016

    10 of opera's greatest soprano roles

    From the Queen of the Night to Turandot by way of Norma and Brünnhilde, we round up some of opera’s most devilishly difficult soprano roles.